Pick the right Poop Bags

DOG POOP BAGS

We love our pets. But we don’t like the poop from them, right?  Leaving your pets’ poop lying everywhere in the home poses a risk to your health and therefore an adequate dog waste management and disposal method needs to be adopted by you as the pet owner.  With the advent of poop bags, I don’t think there’s an excuse of leaving your faithful animal friend pooping everywhere around the homestead.

  • Choosing the right type

Which type of a poop bag is the most appropriate for you?  In order to reach a decision on which type of poop bag you’ll purchase, you should be able to know whether you are going to use it at home in the event of an accident or when you are walking your dog at the park.

  • Factors to consider

Before buying that poop bag for your dog, you must consider the following factors.

  • Type of material

Some dog poop bags are made of plastic which is non-biodegradable and others are made of material that is more environmentally friendly.

  • Thickness

How thick the material is will determine your convenience especially when taking your dog for a walk.

  • Odor

Dog poop obviously has a foul smell so you wouldn’t want to carry around a stinking mess when on a walk. Some dog poop bags are scented to conceal the bad odor.

  • Types of dog poop bags

Yes they also come in different types and they vary according to their environmental friendliness and convenience for each dog owner.

  • Handle or No Handle

Bags can come in 2 styles; with tie handles or no handle. This can be important when picking up the poop.

  • Unscented

These are made of any material but the most common thing is that they are not popular because of the stink that is likely to be a put off.

  • Scented

Are you one of those who like to take a walk along with their pets? Then these ones are for you. They are usually laced with a fresh powdered scent so as to mask the odor from the poop.

  • Dispenser bags

These bags consist of a unique hook on the back that makes them convenient to carry along.

So there you are. Whatever your choice of a poop bag, the underlying thing is that proper disposal should be a priority in order to protect the environment and your health from adverse effects that dog poop can bring. Next time, try and consider using discount dog poop bags as a option

 

 

 

Spring is in the air

The latest scoop – and I hope you do – on your dog.
Well spring has sprung and now more then ever it is so pleasant to take your dog for a walk or just let him/her run outside and get rid of all that energy.  However, spring has many hazards for your dog.  Here are some of the most important:
    1.    Ticks are an ever present danger for your dogs.  They are easily picked up and can be the source of many illnesses.  The best way to counteract this is prevention.  Of course, this can be discussed with your vet.    There are many preventative remedies to be found.  But.  Beware of false claims.
2.    Heartworm disease again can be easily contracted; it is transmitted by mosquitoes.  It is a serious disease that mainly affects the heart and lungs.  It can also affect the liver, kidneys, eyes and central nervous system.  If untreated it can kill your dog.  Again consult your vet. for treatment, vaccination.  Don’t leave it too late.
3.    This is the time when many people, like me, are fertilizing our gardens.  Fertilizers contain many potentially, toxic chemicals.  There are now, however, some pet friendly fertilizers on the market.  Read the directions first.  Also beware of pesticides, fungicides and herbicides.  Be especially careful in your use of slug bait.
4.    Although bees are our friends and there appears to be  problems within the bee population, they can be vey harmful to your dog.  How many times have I seen Roversnapping at bees only to catch and swallow one.  If your dog romps  into a bee nest and is stung by many bees, then it is time to take him/her to your vet,  post haste.
5.    Beware of thawing ice and swollen creeks.  It is best to keep your dog on a leash when dangerous, streams ponds are in the vicinity.
I think the underlying fact here is that you should have a healthy relationship with your vet and take your pet see him/her for regular check-ups.

P.P.P* Pick up your pet’s poop.

P.P.P* Pick up your pet’s poop.

Have you ever been strolling along on a nice, sunny spring day, only to be halted in your tracks when your eye catches a neatly tied, full poop bag? Perhaps right in front of you on the sidewalk, on the boulevard or thrown carelessly against a lamp post or under a hedge. How disgusting is this? And you think, who would go to all the trouble of carrying a poop bag, do the responsible thing of scooping up and then NOT disposing it correctly in a sanitary way? Who indeed?
There is also another problem on the rise – the winter counterpart of this. That is the person who believes that by leaving the poop on the snow, it will melt away in the spring. However, the result of this rather inconsiderate behaviour can be quite alarming. Although the actual poop may eventually disappear, the eggs contained within the fecal matter, never do! The problem here is that when he eggs from the parasites within the fecal matter become infected they constitute a serious health hazard. Specific larvae can hatch, easily get passed on to people, particularly children who tend to play in these areas. The children then pick up these organisms which can travel through their organisms leading to a banquet of of health problems.
This is why many municipalities are passing ordinances designed to reduce this kind of reckless activity Should this be necessary? Do we only do the right thing in fear of “bad” consequences?
Surely, all that is needed is a bit of forethought and consideration. Then all this can be avoided.

P.P.P* Pick up your pet’s poop.